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			PubMed Journals: J Med Virol

  Source:		PMID: 32056235


    		J Med Virol. 2020 Feb 13. doi:
     		10.1002/jmv.25708. [Epub ahead of print]

			Does SARS-CoV-2 has a longer
			incubation period than SARS and MERS?

			Jiang X(1)(2), Rayner S(3)(4)(5), Luo
			MH(1)(2)(5)(6)(7).

			Author Information
			(1) The Joint Center of Translational Precision
			Medicine Guangzhou Institute of Pediatrics,
			Guangzhou Women and Children Medical
			Center, Guangzhou, China.
			(2) The Joint Center of Translational Precision
			Medicine, Wuhan Institute of Virology,
			Chinese Academy of Sciences, Wuhan, China.
			(3) Department of Medical Genetics,
			Oslo University Hospital and University of Oslo,
			Oslo, Norway.
			(4) Hybrid Technology Hub-Centre of
			Excellence, Institute of Basic Medical Sciences,
			University of Oslo, Oslo, Norway.
			(5) Wuhan Institute of Virology, Chinese
			Academy of Sciences, Wuhan, China.
			(6) State Key Laboratory of Virology, CAS
			Center for Excellence in Brain Science and
			Intelligence Technology (CEBSIT), Wuhan
			Institute of Virology, Chinese Academy of
			Sciences, Wuhan, China.
			(7) University of Chinese Academy of Sciences,
			Beijing, China.

			The outbreak of a novel coronavirus
			(SARS-CoV-2) since December 2019 in Wuhan,
			the major transportation hub in central China,
			became an emergency of major international
			concern. While several etiological studies have
			begun to reveal the specific biological features
			of this virus, the epidemic characteristics need
			to be elucidated. Notably, a long incubation
			time was reported to be associated with
			SARS-CoV-2 infection, leading to adjustments
			in screening and control policies. To avoid the
			risk of virus spread, all potentially exposed
			subjects are required to be isolated for 14 days,
			which is the longest predicted incubation time.
			However, based on our analysis of a larger
			dataset available so far, we find there is no
			observable difference between the incubation
			time for SARS-CoV-2,
			severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus
			(SARS-CoV), and
			middle east respiratory syndrome coronavirus
			(MERS-CoV), highlighting the need for larger
			and well-annotated datasets.

			©2020 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

			DOI: 10.1002/jmv.25708 PMID: 32056235

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